history of tms

The History of TMS

Depression is a common mental disorder characterized by persistent sadness and a loss of interest in activities people usually enjoy. It is estimated that more than 300 million people worldwide suffer from depression, with 16.1 million adults in the United States alone affected by the condition.

While the causes of depression are varied and complex, one major factor is thought to be an imbalance of certain chemicals in the brain, known as neurotransmitters. 

Neurotransmitters are responsible for transmitting messages between nerve cells and play a role in regulating mood, sleep, appetite, and energy levels. When there is an imbalance of neurotransmitters, it can lead to symptoms of depression.

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Source: Roots TMS

What Is TMS?

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a non-invasive procedure that uses magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain. This stimulation can modulate the activity of those cells and help relieve symptoms of certain mental disorders.

How TMS Works

TMS is thought to work by changing the activity of neurotransmitters in the brain. Neurotransmitters are chemicals that transmit messages between nerve cells and regulate mood, sleep, appetite, and energy levels. When there is an imbalance of neurotransmitters, it can lead to symptoms of mental disorders.

A magnetic coil is placed against the head near the forehead during a TMS procedure. The coil emits brief pulses of magnetic energy that pass through the skull and stimulate the nerve cells in the brain. This stimulation can help normalize those cells’ activity and relieve mental disorders’ symptoms.

TMS is non-invasive, does not require anesthesia, and has few side effects. It is typically done on an outpatient basis, and most people return to their normal activities after each treatment session.

is tms fda approved
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TMS in Discovery

TMS was first developed in the 1980s as a potential treatment for epilepsy. Epilepsy is a disorder characterized by recurrent seizures, and researchers thought that TMS might be able to stop seizures by stimulating the brain. However, early studies of TMS in people with epilepsy were not promising, and the treatment did not gain much traction.

In the 1990s, new research emerged suggesting that TMS might effectively treat depression. Depression is a mental disorder that can cause a person to feel sad and hopeless and lose interest in activities they once enjoyed. While there are many treatments for depression, some people do not respond well to medications or other therapies.

For these people, TMS could be a life-changing treatment. In 2008, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved TMS to treat depression.

TMS Today

TMS treats various mental disorders, including depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While more research is needed to determine how well TMS works for these conditions, many people have found relief from their symptoms with this treatment.

If you are considering TMS for your mental health needs, talk to your doctor to see if it is right for you.

when was tms fda approved
Source: Roots TMS

What Conditions Can TMS Treat?

The FDA first approved TMS in 2008 to treat the major depressive disorder. Since then, it has been used to treat various conditions, including anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), OCD, and migraines.

Depression

Depression is a common mental disorder characterized by persistent sadness and a loss of interest in activities people usually enjoy. It is estimated that more than 300 million people worldwide suffer from depression, with 16.1 million adults in the United States alone affected by the condition.

Anxiety

Anxiety is a common mental disorder characterized by feelings of worry, tension, and fear. It is estimated that more than 300 million people worldwide suffer from anxiety, with 18.1% of adults in the United States affected by the condition.

OCD

OCD is a common mental disorder characterized by persistent and unwanted thoughts and/or repetitive behaviors commonly known as compulsions. It is estimated that more than 2% of adults in the United States suffer from OCD, with 1 in 100 children affected by the condition.

PTSD

PTSD is a common mental disorder characterized by intrusive thoughts, flashbacks, and avoidance behaviors following a traumatic event. It is estimated that more than 3% of adults in the United States will experience PTSD at some point in their lives, with women twice as likely as men to be affected by the condition.

Migraines

Migraines are a common type of headache characterized by throbbing pain, nausea, and sensitivity to light and sound. It is estimated that more than 1 billion people worldwide suffer from migraines, with 18% of adults in the United States affected by the condition.

how long has tms been around
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When was TMS FDA approved?

The FDA first approved TMS in 2008 to treat the major depressive disorder. Since then, it has been used to treat various conditions, including anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), OCD, and migraines.

What are the side effects of TMS?

The most common side effect of TMS is headaches. Other potential side effects include scalp discomfort at the site of stimulation, lightheadedness, and dizziness. These side effects are usually mild and go away on their own after a few sessions.

What is the success rate of TMS?

There is a great deal of variation in the success rates of TMS, as each individual responds differently to the treatment. TMS is most successful in people who have failed to respond to other treatments, such as medication or therapy.

One study found that 38% of people with treatment-resistant depression achieved remission after receiving TMS. Remission is defined as a reduction in symptoms that meets the criteria for no longer having depression. This means that their symptoms were so mild that they no longer met the criteria for a diagnosis of depression.

Final Thoughts

TMS is a promising treatment for people with mental disorders who have not responded to other treatments. If you are considering TMS for your mental health needs, talk to your doctor to see if it is right for you. We at Roots TMS are here to answer any questions you may have and help you on your journey to mental wellness. Call us today to learn more about TMS and how it can help you.

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